Our Board

Peter Clinch

Peter Clinch is Jean Monnet Full Professor and Chair of Public Policy at University College Dublin. Peter holds BA, MA and PhD degrees in economics and a Diploma in Environmental Impact Assessment. He is the author of over 100 publications including books, book chapters, international journal articles and conference proceedings and around 100 conference papers and other publications. Peter has held Visiting Positions or has been an invited speaker at, inter alia, the University of California, Berkeley and San Diego, Said Business School at Oxford University, Cambridge University, the University of Southern California, and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He is an affiliate Faculty member of the competitiveness programme at Harvard Business School and has advised or worked on behalf of, inter alia, the World Bank, OECD, and several national governments.


Donal de Buitléir

Donal de Buitléir is Chairman of the Low Pay Commission. He was former Director of Public Policy.ie, 2012-2018, and a Board Member of the Health Services Executive 2005-09. Previously he worked in AIB Group and in the Irish public service. He was Secretary to the Commission on Taxation 1980-85. He was a member of a number of Government reviews in the areas of local government reform, integration of tax and welfare, business regulation, health funding and higher education. He is an Eisenhower Fellow.


Liam Delaney

Liam Delaney is Professor of Economics at UCD and Visiting Professor of Economics at Stirling University. A former Fulbright and Marie Sklodowska Curie Fellow, he was Deputy Director of the UCD Geary Institute from 2008 to 2011, and Deputy Dean of Stirling Management School from 2011 to 2016. He has worked at the intersection of economics and psychology for his career and has published widely in both economics and psychology journals, including Economic Journal, Journal of European Economics Association, Health Psychology, Psychological Science, and Journal of Applied Psychology. He is particularly interested in the measurement foundations of behavioural welfare economics and has built several interdisciplinary projects examining how to measure real-world economic preferences. He is currently developing a major new centre for behavioural science and public policy at UCD Geary Institute.


Michelle Norris

Michelle Norris is the Head of the School of the School of Social Policy, Social Work and Social Justice, University College Dublin and teaches social policy on the Bachelor of Social Science (B.Soc.Sc ) and Master of Public Policy (MPP) degrees. Her teaching and research interests focus on housing policy and urban regeneration, particularly on: – the management and financing of social housing – the regeneration of social housing estates and inner urban areas – comparative analysis of housing provision in Europe – the history and socio-economic implications of Irish housing policy and its relationship with the welfare state. Michelle’s latest book entitled Property, Family and the Irish Welfare State was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2016. Michelle is also co-convener of the European Network for Housing Research Working Group on Comparative Housing Policy, and a member of the international advisory of the International Journal of Housing Policy. In 2011 she was appointed by an Taoiseach as an independent member of the National Economic and Social Council (NESC) which advises the Irish government on economic, environmental and social policy, and she was appointed for a second term in 2016. In 2012 and again in 2017 she was appointed by the Minister for Housing as chair of the Housing Finance Agency (hfa.ie). The Agency raises finance on international markets which it lends to local authorities and housing associations for the provision of housing to low income households.


Rory O’Donnell

Rory O’Donnell is Director of the National Economic & Social Council. In his work as Economist and later Director at NESC he undertook and led analysis on a wide range of economic, social and environmental issues aimed at creation of a shared understanding within the Council and in the Irish policy system.  He has written extensively on social partnership and has been invited to speak internationally on social dialogue and concertation.  He was previously Jean Monet Professor of Business at University College Dublin, where he edited a review of Ireland’s first 25 years in the EU, Europe – The Irish Experience (Institute of European Affairs, 2000) and co-authored Europe’s Experimental Union: Rethinking Integration (Routledge, 2000). He holds an MSc in Economics from the University of London and a PhD from the University of Cambridge.


Maev-Ann Wren

Maev-Ann Wren is joint Research Area Co-ordinator for Health and Quality of Life research at the ESRI. Since 2014, she has been a lead researcher of a research programme, funded by the Department of Health, to provide evidence for the reform of the healthcare system. She was lead author of two major ESRI Research Series Reports from that programme, “An Examination of the Potential Costs of Universal Health Insurance in Ireland” (2015) and “Projections of demand for healthcare in Ireland, 2015-2030: First report from the Hippocrates Model” (2017). Maev-Ann is also a lead researcher on three Health Research Board-funded projects on: alternative approaches to achieving universal healthcare; health and social service supply, use and need by area in Ireland; and costs of cognitive impairment post-stroke. Maev-Ann has a PhD in Economics from Trinity College Dublin (TCD), an MA in Economics from University College Dublin (UCD), and a BA in Economics and History from UCD. She worked as Special Advisor to Roisin Shortall T.D., Minister of State at the Department of Health with responsibility for Primary Care, from 2011 to 2012. With Professor A. Dale Tussing, she was commissioned in 2005 by the Irish Congress of Trade Unions to review the Irish healthcare system and recommend reform. Their study was published as Tussing and Wren (2006) How Ireland Cares, New Island. Her earlier book, Wren M.A (2003) Unhealthy State, New Island, is a much-cited reference on the Irish healthcare system.